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Archive for 2011

Noe Mayorga

Noe Mayorga

Noe Mayorga as told to Daehan Yoon. Noe Mayorga, a student of English through the News class at Bellevue College, said his name stands for “Noah” in Bible. He came to U.S. from El Salvador 4 years ago following his wife who is American.  One more member of his family is a cat named Orion.

11.27.2011| Reader Story

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Name on a steel beam

Name on a steel beam

Photographer: Alan Berner / The Seattle Times . This ironworker is working on a new building, Building Hope, at Seattle Children’s hospital. He is painting Gillie-Jean on a steel beam. He wants to make Gillie-Jane happy. She is a patient at the hospital. She and other very sick children live on the cancer floor.

11.23.2011| Featured, Uncategorized

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What’s happening in Nov and Dec

What's happening in November Thanksgiving Day November 24, 2011 is Thanksgiving Day in the U.S. This holiday comes from long ago. In 1620, a group of Pilgrims left England for America. The Pilgrims wanted to find religious freedom in America. They landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The Native Americans gave the Pilgrims a lot of advice about how to grow food.

11.21.2011| What's Happening

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Building Hope

Building Hope

 Photographer: Alan Berner / The Seattle Times . Since August 2011, the children on the cancer floor of Seattle Children’s Hospital have eagerly gotten out of bed each morning to look out their big windows. They watch the iron workers putting up steel beams for a new building.

11.21.2011| Local

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Elwha River

Elwha River

Photographer: Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times . This is the Elwha River in Olympic National Park. Soon it will look very different. The National Park Service is removing two old dams. This will take from 2 to 3 years. After that, the Elwha River will run free again from mountains to ocean.

11.21.2011| Featured, Uncategorized

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Goodbye dams!

Goodbye dams!

  Photographer: Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times . Every year, thousands of salmon swim to the base of Elwha Dam and stop. They cannot swim home to spawn (lay eggs). But these frustrated fish have a wonderful surprise in their future. On September 17, 2011, the National Park Service began to remove the first of two old and no-longer-useful dams on the Elwha River in the Olympic National Forest.

11.21.2011| Local

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ASL Class

ASL Class

Photographer: Erika Shultz / The Seattle Times . Dhan and Bee Biswakarma are from Bhutan. They have a disability. They cannot hear (deaf). In Bhutan, they could not attend school. But, in the U.S., they can go to school. They are attending a special class at Highline Community College.

11.21.2011| Featured, Uncategorized

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ASL, not ESL, for immigrants

ASL, not ESL, for immigrants

Photographer: Erika Shultz / The Seattle Times . Highline Community College is offering hope to eight refugees from Bhutan. It started last spring as a special American Sign Language (ASL) class for deaf or hard-of-hearing immigrants. The students are learning how to sign because many people in the deaf and hearing community use it to communicate.

11.21.2011| General News

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The beginning of the end for malaria

In October, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation hosted a Global Malaria Forum in Seattle. At the meeting, scientists from the drug company GlaxoSmithKline(GSK) announced the possible development of the first successful malaria vaccine. The vaccine, called “RTS,S” or “Mosquirix,”  is still being tested, but exciting results from a clinical trial in Africa indicate that the vaccine could reduce the number of cases of malaria by 50% each year. Malaria is a disease spread by the bite of a certain kind of mosquito.

11.21.2011| General News

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7,000,000,000 people!

On Oct. 29, 2011, the world’s population reached 7 billion. It happened so fast. In 1930, it was only 2 billion. Modern medicine is one reason. People are living longer. One-third of the world’s people live in China and India. China has 1.3 billion people, and India has 1.2 billion.

11.21.2011| International

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Enjoy your mobile wallet in Kenya!

In Kenya, 10 million people are enjoying the latest way to manage money – mobile wallets. In 2007, Safaricom introduced M-PESA (M for mobile and PESA for money in Swahili). Kenyans use this popular mobile phone service to send and receive money. Many people in Kenya do not have bank accounts or an internet connection, but they have mobile phones. The service is easy to use.

11.21.2011| International

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Tunisia votes

Only months after popular protests led to the fall of its long-time dictator, Tunisia has chosen a human rights activist to be its interim president. Moncef Marzouki, leader of the political party Congress for the Republic (CPR), will serve as president for the next year while a new constitution is being written.

11.21.2011| International

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Shahlo Talib

Shahlo Talib

My name is Shahlo Talib. I am from Tajikistan in Central Asia. I have been living in America for almost three years. I live in Kirkland, WA, with my husband. He is an IT consultant. We don’t have children yet. We like to watch comedies, art pro­grams, and Discovery channel programs about sea life.

06.1.2011| Reader Story

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What’s happening in June

May 27 - June 12 The Port­land Rose Festival was start­ed in 1907. The Grand Floral Parade starts at 10:00 a.m. on June 6th. June 5 World Environment Day was launched by the U.N. General Assembly in 1972. It is held annually on June 5th to bring attention to environ­mental issues and to promote sustainable development in communities. June 14 Flag Day celebrates the day in 1777 that the US flag was chosen. June 21 The Summer Solstice is the first day of summer. June 19 – 20 The Fremont Fair Solstice Parade begins at noon on Saturday, June 20th. June 19 Father’s Day is the third Sunday in June.

06.1.2011| What's Happening

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Swinomish Hat

Swinomish Hat

Photographer: Mary Evitt / La Conner Weekly News. Is it a giant hat or a building? It is both! The Swinomish Tribe is building three large halls at Swadabs Park. The park is near LaConner, Washington. These buildings will look like cedar hats. Native American tribes of Puget Sound wore cedar hats.

06.1.2011| Featured, Uncategorized

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Goose goo gone

Goose goo gone

Photographer: Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times Gary Elkman works for the Seattle Parks Department. He drives a special machine at Gas Works Park. This machine picks up after the geese. Geese like parks. But so do people. Geese are messy. No one wants to hurt the geese.

06.1.2011| Featured, Uncategorized

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Statue of Liberty Balloon

Statue of Liberty Balloon

Photographer: Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times The real Statue of Liberty is in New York. This one is at Gas Works Park in Seattle. It is a balloon. Jason and Halley Cowden are also at the park. They are enjoying the sunshine. They will come back to the park for the 4th of July.

06.1.2011| Featured, Uncategorized

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Canoe Journey

July 25 will be a day of pride for the Swinomish Tribe. They are hosting the 2011 Canoe Journey. On that day, First Nations people of the West Coast will paddle in long canoes on the Swinomish Channel near La Conner. The canoe pad­dlers will land at Swadabs Park.

06.1.2011| Local

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Tsunami Debris

The giant tsunami that came to shore after the March 11 earthquake in Japan destroyed entire cities and swept more than 200,000 buildings out to sea. Videos of the event show cars, boats, trucks, entire houses, and many personal and household items drifting on the water. All of this has come together to make a sort of debris “soup.” Reports indicate the debris mass is 500 miles long.

06.1.2011| Local

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Bilingual brain

By Tatiana Kuzmina, Iryna Pavlenko, Haesung Yoon Immigrants often struggle to learn English. However, they and their children may gain a significant benefit from speaking more than one language. According to recent studies presented by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, bilingualism, or the ability to speak two languages fluently, has a positive impact on the brain. Bilingual speakers need to move continually from one lan­guage to another.

06.1.2011| General News

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